Value Analysis Model

Opportunity

In 2017, Jump Simulation , a part of OSF Innovation , was the first center to adopt a return on investment model developed by Jack Phillips of the ROI Institute to not only calculate the monetary value of simulation—but to measure the impact of intangibles, such as improving patient safety and employee satisfaction. Jump renamed the methodology, “Value Analysis Model,” to emphasize the importance of taking into account all levels of value: Reaction, Learning, Application, Impact and ROI. The successful use of this model prompted Jump Education to find ways of easily sharing this concept with other simulation centers around the world.

Jump Simulation Value Analysis Model webinar

Solution

Jump Education created an ROI board game and course to help other educators and administrators outside of OSF HealthCare apply the Value Analysis framework to determine the value of their own simulation-based programs. While the team has taken this workshop on the road at national and international conferences as well as individual trainings, it is also offering it using teleconference technology. Leaders of a simulation center at the University of Alabama at Birmingham were the first to take the online facilitated course.

Impact

The two-hour webinar gave eight people from the University of Alabama the opportunity to participate, negating the need for travel for either facilitators from Jump or learners from the school. This saved the university $4,861. It also saved Jump at least 14 hours of facilitator time for travel.

“This was a new way for us to teach one of our courses and it went really well. This opportunity allows us to expand our offerings to institutions that might not have the resources to send learners to Jump or bring our team to them.”

-Lisa Barker, MD, director of education, Jump Simulation

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Teaching simulation centers how to determine value

Medical simulation is an engaging way to educate a variety of clinicians—from those entering medicine for the first time to those who’ve spent many years treating patients. It’s been shown to improve quality of care as well as patient safety outcomes. But it’s also more resource intensive than most other methods, there’s typically overhead costs associated with it and there’s additional complexity related to putting a simulation activity together. With health care systems across the country finding ways to reduce expenditures, some wonder whether the benefit of this type of training outweighs the costs.

Understanding the need to define the value of simulation-based programming, Jump Simulation  researched a number of theories and models around ROI in health care and education. In 2017, it landed on a model developed by Jack Phillips of the ROI Institute that helps health care systems evaluate projects in five levels: Reaction, Learning, Application, Impact and ROI. Jump re-named the methodology, “Value Analysis Model,” to emphasize the importance of all of the levels of value.

The Value Analysis Model helps Jump calculate the monetary value of simulation as well as measure the qualitative benefits, such as improving patient safety and employee satisfaction. The successful use of this model prompted to Jump Education find ways of sharing this concept with other simulation centers around the world.

The team created an ROI board game and course to help other educators and administrators outside of OSF HealthCare apply the Value Analysis framework to determine the value of their own simulation-based programs. Jump has offered learning opportunities at international and national conferences. The Education team has also traveled to other health care systems to teach the model. Now it’s offering webinars for those who can’t travel or don’t have the resources to bring Jump to them.

An easy way to teach and learn

There are a number of courses Jump offers to clinicians within OSF HealthCare as well as to outside institutions.

“These typically take a half-day to complete, not including the travel associated with both myself and the learners who want to take the course,” said Lisa Barker, MD , director of Education at Jump. “We knew there was an easier way to conduct the Value Analysis workshop for anyone who wants or needs it.”

With that, Jump Education developed a two-hour webinar to help institutions learn how to apply the Value Analysis Model using the ROI Board Game without having to leave their workplaces. The simulation center at the University of Alabama at Birmingham was the first group to try this offering.

“For this to work, we had to send the team in Alabama two ROI games as the model is taught through playing the game,” said Barker. “Then all we had to do was link our IT expert with the university’s IT experts, test the connection, ensure participants were sitting in a manner where I could see all of them and then we were able to move forward.”

The course goes over how simulation centers can maximize their chances and opportunities for demonstrating positive impact with simulation—all the way to demonstrating return on investment and what that requires on a conceptual level. By the end of the game and class, learners should be able to describe at least five measures for assessing quality and providing feedback for simulation education programming.

Saving time and money

The two-hour webinar gave eight people from the University of Alabama the opportunity to participate, negating the need for travel for either facilitators from Jump or learners from the school. Jump faculty were also able to reduce the amount of time they would normally take to teach the course.

In travel time alone, the online method of education saved learners at the university $668 in travel costs per person. The overall savings equates to $4,861.  Meanwhile Jump saved at least 14 hours of facilitator time for travel.