OSF St. Joseph Medical Center

Bloomington, Illinois

OSF Wound Care Clinic

OSF Wound Care supports the Mission of OSF HealthCare by providing quality wound care to clients and the community, and augmenting and complementing existing OSF HealthCare services.

Services

Wound care is provided to patients age 10 and over with chronic, non-healing wounds of greater than 30 days. These also include individuals with slow-healing wounds or those with both an acute or chronic wound and a co-morbidity, which might inhibit wound healing.

Certain acute wounds including burns, skin tears, and lacerations may also be evaluated. Wounds such as:

  • Venous ulcers
  • Arterial ulcers
  • Traumatic wounds
  • Non-healing surgical wounds
  • Diabetic ulcers
  • Abscesses
  • Skin tears
  • Burns
  • Decubitus ulcers
  • Lacerations
  • Atypical ulcers (pyoderma gangrenosum or calciphylaxis)

Treatment Options

Wound care specialists at the OSF Wound Care Clinic work with your physician to develop an individualized treatment plan.

Treatment options may include:

  • Vascular, plastic and general surgery
  • Hyperbaric oxygen therapy
  • Debridement
  • Compression therapy
  • Nutritional and diabetes education
  • Patient and caregiver education
  • Advanced wound dressings
  • Physical therapy
  • Home care coordination
  • Counseling
  • Lymphedema and negative pressure therapy

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

An advanced treatment option available at the OSF Wound Care Clinic may include hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT).

The Clinic recently expanded to accommodate two bariatric hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) chambers – the Sechrist 4100H model – which aid the healing process of non-healing wounds. These bariatric chambers are specifically helpful for individuals who suffer from claustrophobia or who may be obese as they hold up to 700 pounds where typical chambers hold up to 450 pounds.

HBOT is a medical treatment in which the patient is entirely enclosed in a pressure chamber breathing 100 percent pure oxygen at greater than one atmosphere pressure. Air contains nearly 21 percent oxygen and approximately 78 percent nitrogen. In HBOT, the oxygen percentage breathed by the patient is nearly or actually 100 percent, almost five times more than in air. The pressure of the oxygen breathed by the patient in a hyperbaric oxygen chamber is usually more than 1.5 times (and can be as much as 3 times) greater than atmospheric pressure. The therapy can deliver nearly 15 times as much oxygen as there is in air at normal pressure. The goal is to fill the blood with enough oxygen to repair tissues and restore normal body function.

Use of the chambers usually involves 90-minute treatment times; patients are seen five days per week for 4-6 number of weeks, depending upon the treatment plan.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy helps wound healing by bringing oxygen-rich plasma to tissue starved for oxygen. Wound injuries damage the body's blood vessels, which release fluid that leaks into the tissues and causes swelling. This swelling deprives the damaged cells of oxygen, and tissue starts to die. HBOT reduces swelling while flooding the tissues with oxygen. The elevated pressure in the chamber increases in the amount of oxygen in the blood. HBOT aims to break the cycle of swelling, oxygen starvation, and tissue death.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is not for everyone. It should not be used by people who have had recent ear surgery or ear trauma, a cold or fever, or certain types of lung disease. 
 

Appointment Information

All OSF Wound Care Clinic patients will receive an initial screening by the nurse. Written consent will be obtained to take pictures of the wound(s) and for debridement, biopsy, incision and drainage, laceration management, or other procedure if indicated. The patient’s history will be obtained and the wounds will be measured, cleansed, and assessed by the nurse.

When appropriate, the patient, significant other, and other health care providers are involved in the process.

The OSF Wound Care Clinic provider will evaluate and treat the wound(s) and any related problems. Related tests or referrals may also be initiated. These may include:

  • Bacterial culture
  • Biopsy
  • Routine labs
  • Complete blood count (CBC)
  • Comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP)
  • Ankle-brachial index (ABI)
  • Toe-brachial index (TBI)
  • Pre-albumin
  • X-ray
  • Arterial or Venous Doppler of the legs
  • Computed tomography (CT)
  • Bone scan
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

Staff

Ira Halperin, DO, Internal Medicine

David Naour, MD, General Surgery

Todd Snoeyink, DO, Podiatry

W. Marc Leonard, DPM, Podiatry

Teresa Mejorado, PA-C, Internal Medicine

Hours

Office hours are Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.